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14 April 2021

Irene de la Torre Arenas presents the results of last month mobile app data challenge. The change of individual app usage over time has been visualised in very different ways as well as its impact on individual symptoms of COPD. The discussion center around the usability of the respective display type for the given purpose . All visualisations are available on the Wonderful Wednesday blog.

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Irene de la Torre Arenas presents the results of last month mobile app data challenge. The change of individual app usage over time has been visualised in very different ways as well as its impact on individual symptoms of COPD. The discussion center around the usability of the respective display type for the given purpose . All visualisations are available on the Wonderful Wednesday blog. 

The weekly app usage was shown in a video of scatter plots for all individuals. A deep dive into all aspects of the data was made possible by an interactive dashboard that connects two different rankings via line-up linking. For an overview on the whole observation period a multiplot mirrored bar chart over time is very useful, especially because of the different sorting orders that can be applied interactively. For the display of the timing of app usage a daily overlayed dot plot is presented.

The next challenge is about sustained response data. Find out more on the Wonderful Wednesday homepage

Wonderful Wednesdays are brought to you by the Visualisation SIG. The Wonderful Wednesday team includes: Bodo Kirsch, Alexander Schacht, Mark Baillie, Daniel Saure, Zachary Skrivanek, Lorenz Uhlmann, Rachel Phillips, Markus Vogler, David Carr, Steve Mallett, Abi Williams, Julia Igel, Gakava Lovemore, Katie Murphy, Rhys Warham, Sara Zari, Irene de la Torre Arenas.

24 March 2021

Watch this Journal Club webinar to hear Dominic Magirr (Novartis) and Chang Yu (Vanderbilt University) present their recent work. With the webinar chaired by Jennifer Rogers (PHASTAR).

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Dominic Magirr (Novartis):- Non‐proportional hazards in immuno‐oncology: Is an old perspective needed?
Authors: Dominic Magirr; Pharmaceutical Statistics. 20 20;1-16.
Click here to view the slides

Chang Yu (Vanderbilt University):- A weighted log‐rank test and associated effect estimator for cancer trials with delayed treatment effect
Authors: Chang Yu, Xiang Huang, Hui Nian and Philip He; Pharmaceutical Statistics. 20 21;1– 23.
Click here to view the slides

16 March 2021

This webinar will give an overview of the system and the data collected, along with the benefits gained from continuous cage monitoring using the DVC®. We will use a case study to highlight some of the key discussion points in this presentation.

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Typically, animal welfare and behaviour are monitored and assessed visually at periodic times throughout the day. However, in order to go beyond this level of assessment we have been using the Digital Ventilated Cage (DVC®) to capture this information quantitively. The DVC® is a non-invasive Home Cage Monitoring system that uses electromagnetic sensors to track and monitor the cage activity. Research Statistics advised on study designs, protocols and carried out extensive exploratory and further statistical analyses on the data. This webinar will give an overview of the system and the data collected, along with the benefits gained from continuous cage monitoring using the DVC®. We will use a case study to highlight some of the key discussion points in this presentation.

10 March 2021

Steve Mallet leads the discussion on ways to display data that is actually missing. The example data was based on a study with multiple measurements of pain that were partially incomplete. The presented visualisations can help to describe the amount, the nature and the impact of missing data on the study outcome. The mirrored histogram highlighted the difference in missing data in specific subgroups. In the Sankey diagram it is possible to see the missing data linked to the actual outcome pain. The course of pain over time is nicely shown in an animated scatter plot. For exploration of the complete data a complex lasagna plot surrounded with additional graphs gives insight. And a powerful tool to actually guide the reader though the data is scrolly-telling. All visualisation are available on the Wonderful Wednesday blog.

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Steve Mallet leads the discussion on ways to display data that is actually missing. The example data was based on a study with multiple measurements of pain that were partially incomplete. The presented visualisations can help to describe the amount, the nature and the impact of missing data on the study outcome. The mirrored histogram highlighted the difference in missing data in specific subgroups. In the Sankey diagram it is possible to see the missing data linked to the actual outcome pain. The course of pain over time is nicely shown in an animated scatter plot. For exploration of the complete data a complex lasagna plot surrounded with additional graphs gives insight. And a powerful tool to actually guide the reader though the data is scrolly-telling. All visualisation are available on the Wonderful Wednesday blog.

There was a wide range of visualisations presented serving very different purposes. A simple heat map focusses on the amount of missing data in the different treatment arms. The next challenge is about mobile app data. How does individual app usage change over time? And how does app usage impact individual outcomes?

Wonderful Wednesdays are brought to you by the Visualisation SIG. The Wonderful Wednesday team includes: Bodo Kirsch, Alexander Schacht, Mark Baillie, Daniel Saure, Zachary Skrivanek, Lorenz Uhlmann, Rachel Phillips, Markus Vogler, David Carr, Steve Mallett, Abi Williams, Julia Igel, Gakava Lovemore, Katie Murphy, Rhys Warham, Sara Zari, Irene de la Torre Arenas 

03 March 2021

An introduction to the event from the chair of PSI CALC and Panel Discussion featuring company volunteers.

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An introduction to the event from the chair of PSI CALC and Panel Discussion featuring company volunteers.

02 March 2021

Wearable technologies and digital health data offer great opportunities for studying patients functionally in real life settings. Actigraphy, for example, can be used as part of clinical trials to collect continuous movement data, but the frequency of data collection results in dense datasets requiring extensive processing and signal detection. In this webinar, a panel of expert speakers will discuss how such aspects can be addressed to help realize the promise of these technologies.

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Wearable technologies and digital health data offer great opportunities for studying patients functionally in real life settings. Actigraphy, for example, can be used as part of clinical trials to collect continuous movement data, but the frequency of data collection results in dense datasets requiring extensive processing and signal detection. In this webinar, a panel of expert speakers will discuss how such aspects can be addressed to help realize the promise of these technologies.

26 February 2021

The journey from invention to patients is a long one... this video outlines the stages of clinical trials.

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26 February 2021

The Role of a Statistician, with Head of the Careers and Academic Liaison Committee, Amanda Darekar.

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26 February 2021

A welcome introduction from the PSI Chair, Lucy Rowell

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26 February 2021

New Starter Presentation – Pharmaceutical Company, presented by Benjamin Webb & Megan Winter.

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26 February 2021

New Starter Presentation – Contract Research Organisation (CRO), presented by Alice McFarlane.

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26 February 2021

New Starter Presentation – Clinical Trial Unit (CTU), presented by Kalpita Joshi.

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